The Boyd Infusion Center- IV Therapy FAQ’s

The Boyd Infusion Center- IV Therapy FAQ’s 23April

Meet Nancy,

Nancy has been a Registered Nurse since 1987. She began her secondary education in the Midwest and went on to become a Registered Nurse at Kapi’olani in Oahu, HI.

Nancy began her career at Shriners Hospital, Honolulu where she enjoyed working with children. After moving to Arizona, Nancy went on to work at Arizona Center for Hematology-Oncology (AZ CHO) in Surprise where she became Chemical Certified and began working as an infusion nurse specializing in chemotherapy treatments.

She would dedicate twenty years at AZ CHO before setting her sights on Wickenburg Community Hospital in November of 2017. Nancy came on board looking for an opportunity to contribute at a rural hospital and she found that at The Boyd Infusion Center.

“It’s a privilege to come to work every day, the patients I care for are truly amazing.”- Nancy Runyan, RN

IV Infusion Therapy FAQ’s

Below are a few helpful suggestions to help you create a pleasant and healing experience.

  • The first and most important step is to replace confusion with confidence.
  • Make a list of questions that pertain to your health condition or questions about your medication and infusion to review with your healthcare practitioner. It may be necessary to make an appointment to review all of your questions.
  • Learn about the infused medication. There are many places to obtain information about your medication. Discuss the medication(s) with your doctor. Pharmaceutical companies often provide information in the offices and on the Internet for patients and their families. There may also be medical books written about your medication or health condition.
  • Visit The Boyd Infusion Center and meet the medical staff before your first infusion.

Check with your healthcare practitioner or the staff at the infusion center for any pre-infusion instructions. Some examples may include:

  • Drink plenty of water to be sure you are well hydrated. If you have a heart condition, kidney condition or any other health condition that prevents you from drinking large amounts of fluid, check with your healthcare practitioner for instructions on how to hydrate before your infusion procedure.
  • Some infusions may require that you pre-medicate with medications such as acetaminophen (Tylenol). Check with the infusion staff regarding any pre-medications you need to take prior to your infusion, the dose, and the best time to take the medications.
  • Wear comfortable loose fitting clothes. You will want to be comfortable, and most likely your vital signs will monitored (for example, blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate (breathing rate), or a cardiac monitor may be attached to your chest). Every infusion center is different, so check with yours in regard to what to expect. Wearing loose fitting clothes allows the medical staff to easily and properly monitor your vital signs.
  • Consider wearing clothing with layers to allow for temperature control. The temperature of the infusion center may be cool or warm; also some intravenous infusions can make you feel either warm or cool. Having layers of clothing allows you the flexibility to easily control your comfort zone.
  • Most infusion centers will provide blankets, pillows, water and coffee.Check to see what the center provides in case they do not offer something that will make you more comfortable.
  • Do not wear any fragrance or perfume, other patients may be allergic.
  • Bring a complete list of current medications, allergies, and emergency contact information for the infusion staff to add to your chart.

What happens during and after the infusion?

  • Ask questions and notify the staff immediately if you are not feeling “right” or have a concern.
  • Consider talking with someone in the Infusion Center receiving treatment. They may have some advice about their health condition that will help you. You may meet a new friend.
  • After your infusion is completed, ask for any important post infusion instructions.
  • You may need to take post-infusion medications. Check with your healthcare practitioner or the infusion staff for detailed instructions.
  • A dressing will be placed in the area where your infusion was done. This dressing should be kept in place for at least 30 minutes or longer. If you are on a blood thinner, leave the dressing in place longer to avoid any bleeding. Check with the staff at the Infusion Center in regard to the length of time necessary to keep the dressing in place.
  • If you have an allergy to tape, inform the infusion staff (advise them of all allergies).
  • Obtain a phone number to call in the event that you have any questions or possible side effects to the medication you receive (such as a fever or rash) after your infusion has been completed.

Be confident- you are in excellent hands with Nancy!

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